Things I learned loading rifle (223) on Dillon 550B




titanNV

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#21
I've had the Dillon swager for several years, but haven't even taken it out the box!I've only loaded pistol so far, but before summer or next winter I might load up some 30'06.
 
#22
I got one but, didn't get the "gage" I did a trial and, err... worked good. I load atm for target, so function is more important than accuracy atm altho my accuracy has been really good. i have to say with the amount of labor that goes into shouldered brass prep (as compared to straight walled brass) it is worth the money. maybe you can't afford it but, save up and, make it your next purchase in this line. you definitely won't regret it.
 

nlvmike

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#23
I found some 3d printed guides that drop in to my Dillon swager on Ebay. They were only a couple of bucks and they make the cases line up perfectly every time. For 300 blackout, Hornady cases must be swaged, and they were a pain without the guides.

I also have gotten a little spoiled on the .308 brass. I bought a box of reloading stuff from an estate, and it had an old Dillon RT 1200 trimmer in it, with a 308 die. I put a sizing/depriming die in station 1 and the power trimmer in station 3 on the 550. I can get through 500 pretty quick, then I wet tumble them and they are ready to go.
 

Shoot'nrust

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#24
I have the Dillion, while expensive it is the best solution in my opinion because it swages the pocket to uniform dimensions rather that removing metal to do so, so pretty much zero chance for the pocket to end up out of spec when you are done, unless of course you somehow manage to to damage the swage punch.
The various handheld uniformers all have the ability to be off center, and the case prep mini lathe styles are just as expensive as the Dillion, but a good bit slower to use.

OK, 1050 users help me out. Does the 1050 actually swage, like the bench top super swager 600, or just remove crimp? I ask because i bought the 1050 to because i thought it swaged. The other day i was loading subsonic blkout with LC brass that had been processed 3 times already on the 1050. The primers were not seating on 1:30. you could feel them binding and they'd be 2/3 of the way in. I call Dillon and spoke to a tech named Lee. He said it's only purpose is to remove the crimp, and that i need to prep my pockets better This was news to me.
OP, sorry to poop on your thread, but I went thru everything you are going thru when I owned a L&N. Brass prep was always the hardest part.
 

TexasJackKin

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#25
I call Dillon and spoke to a tech named Lee.
Did that make anyone else smile?

I've got a Hornady LnL, but do my bottle necks on a single stage, so can't help you. I do my case prep on a Frankfort Armery case prep machine, Trim, inside - outside deburr, and cut the crimps out of the primer pockets. If I remember corrrectly the crimp remover is RCBS, and seems to work well.......YMMV
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#26
From Dillion's own web site at :
https://www.dillonprecision.com/super-1050-reloader_8_1_23877.html

we have the words :
The Super 1050 has an automatically indexed shellplate, a built in primer pocket swager, and features mechanically adjustable primer seating. An electric case feeder is standard equipment on the Super 1050.

I put the bold emphasis on the word swager.

There are only two ways to modify a primer pocket and remove a crimp.
One is by REAMING, and that requires a rotary motion with a reamer and it removes metal. And usually these reamers are sized to also make the pocket a uniform size, to fit the average size of the appropriate primer (small or large).

The other is by SWAGING, and that displaces metal without removing it.

IT would be tough (but not impossible) to build a progressive reloader that reamed the primer pocket as the shell case passed through a station, and it would be messy, as you would have very fine particles of brass all over the press and reloading bench in short order.

As for the Dillion Tech's comment, he is "technically" correct, the only purpose of that stage of the 1050 is to remove the crimp, which it does by swaging the primer pocket, it doesn't clean out the pocket.

So if there are debris left behind (debris as a result of the ignition of the previous primer) one would have to stop and clean out each primer pocket with a brush , that's about all the primer pocket prep one can do, unless you use a pocket "uniformer" which is a reamer, after the swaging and before the brush cleaning that is.

On a progressive press, that kind of defeats the purpose of rapid reloading, doesn't it?

On ammo that is going through its second or third reloading, it would be worth the time to deprime the shells and then clean the primer pocket, the residue of two or three previous primer ignitions could cause the new primer to not to want to seat to a depth where it is slightly below the level of the head.

Once a pocket has been swaged or reamed to remove the crimp, it should not require further work other than cleaning, when it gets to the point that the primer is loose in the pocket, time to toss the shell case into the bucket for brass scrap recycling, there isn't much you can do about a loose primer pocket.
I've yet to see a primer pocket that was reamed or swaged to the proper dimensions "tighten up" so that you couldn't seat a primer in it to the proper depth.

For me that has always been caused by debris in the primer pocket.

Your results may vary.
 
#28
Im using the swager and, the swage guage now. Things have gotten way better with primer seating.
however, I'm still having a problem seating a primer occasionally. What will happen is ill be going along fine then all of a sudden when seating a primer the case will either pop out of the shell holder with the primer half seated or, it will "pop" in as if it were trying to go in not entirely straight. I don't have the resizing die in the 1st station at this point. I do my resizing on a single stage press.
It's like the head isn't flat so it's not sitting straight on the shell plate. but, I check them and, they are.
most of the primers go in just fine. and the swage gage "go side" fits in the pockets well. some are a smidge looser than others but, the "no go" doesn't go in.

wondering if anyone has this issue or, did and, found the reason.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#29
^^ This problem is usually a case head that is undersized, or dirt is on the shell holder causing it to tip the case slightly to one side.
I've had it happen both of the ways you describe above, and majority of the time the shell holder has some crap in it, the minority times it is the case rim that is at fault.
 

titanNV

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#30
. I don't have the resizing die in the 1st station at this point. I do my resizing on a single stage press.
I haven't loaded necked cartridges on my 550 yet. I was thinking I'd resize on single stage, trim, tumble (to get rid of the case lube); then go to 550 to prime, powder, seat and crimp.
Is this common practice with a 550?
 

4x4Brit

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#31
I haven't loaded necked cartridges on my 550 yet. I was thinking I'd resize on single stage, trim, tumble (to get rid of the case lube); then go to 550 to prime, powder, seat and crimp.
Is this common practice with a 550?
That's the way I did it with the 550 when I had it. Keeps everything clean.
 
#32
^^ This problem is usually a case head that is undersized, or dirt is on the shell holder causing it to tip the case slightly to one side.
I've had it happen both of the ways you describe above, and majority of the time the shell holder has some crap in it, the minority times it is the case rim that is at fault.
so it's not uncommon?
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#37
I tumble clean cases before reloading, but I run them completely through either my Dillion XL650 or Lee 1000, using all stages of the press, in other words the press deprimes, sizes, seats the new primer, adds powder, seats the bullet and crimps it in one full pass around the turret.
I keep an air line handy, (used canned air when my reloader wasn't in a portion of the house or garage where I had compressed air) and about every 100 rounds or so, I give the press a squirt of air to clean off any particles of unburned or burned powder or other residue that may have accumulated.

Doing that I rarely ever have a problem with a case that is caused by dirt, and I get to use the press as designed, no extra operations on another press, or with a die removed, etc.
 

MAC702

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#39
While I also do resizing and then the rest of the loading in separate processes for rifle brass, I still sometimes use the Dillon 650 for sizing, even though I'm only using one station. This is so it automatically feeds it and dumps it into the tray. All you have to do is use a good lanolin/alcohol spray lube before you dump the cases into the feeder, instead of a paste lube that you might trust better. The actual sizing is as fast as you operate the handle.