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Is this what precision rifle is these days?

#1
I was browsing the web looking at matches in or around Vegas. I saw these pictures from Sin City Precision. Is this the equipment people are using these days? Can I mount a led sled to a tripod and use a remote trigger? Seriously, is this what people are competing with these days?



 
#2
Being one of the dudes in the pictures I will bite on the snarky comments and say it is a small part of the game on the national level.
Rock on with your lead sled and remote trigger... Those setups all include prep time, so if you can get your sled, barcalounger, and https://www.tracking-point.com/ set up in 2 minutes and get 10 impacts with 10 rounds out at 500-1000 yards on multiple targets at multiple distances on 1.5 MOA targets good on you.
I have worked with a lot of new shooters to the game and the the overwhelming comment is "this is a lot harder than I thought."
Most of the time a stage is just a bipod and a bag, but these photo's are some of the more specialized stages that are thrown at the shooters and are pretty neat photos to those of us that actually go out and shoot this stuff.
For example there are stages where a manufacturer sponsors the stage so you use their shooting sticks/tripod/rifle-mount. With that we find the best way to use the stage prop and get impacts with the gear we have to use.
If your at a location that holds local matches (Las Vegas Desert Sportsmans Rifle and Pistol Club has monthly matches) you can actually do it and see what its about. Normally the people out there at these matches will bend over backwards to help out new shooters and freely share gear... but if your a jackass out of the gate your mileage may vary.
 
#3
Nah man I'm genuinely curious. I'm waiting for my scope to be fixed and taking a look at the state of things. I guess that's evolution. Last time I looked into it that Armageddon game changer bag looked really useful. It just appears its gone far beyond that.

I just assumed the whole purpose of barricades, rooftops, etc was to put the shooter in an awkward position. It just seems that the equipment people are using doesn't make it so awkward. Looks stable AF. Assuming a guy shows up with a 1MOA R700 and a bag is that guy gonna stand a chance at being competitive?
 

CJM

uber n00b
#4
One bag is all you need for 99% of stages for most matches. Those photos you post are of very specialized stages and that equipment is usually provided. It’s always good to see new match shooters out at the matches. Bring what you have and don’t be afraid to ask questions. Most of us experienced match shooters are eager to help out new shooters. Look forward to seeing you out there.
 

gundamit

Super Duper Noob
Forum Supporter
#5
Love the action shots, whats the ball head in the last pic? Also im assuming thats a hog saddle on top of the ball head?
 

steve

Obsessed Member
#7
Nah man I'm genuinely curious. I'm waiting for my scope to be fixed and taking a look at the state of things. I guess that's evolution. Last time I looked into it that Armageddon game changer bag looked really useful. It just appears its gone far beyond that.

I just assumed the whole purpose of barricades, rooftops, etc was to put the shooter in an awkward position. It just seems that the equipment people are using doesn't make it so awkward. Looks stable AF. Assuming a guy shows up with a 1MOA R700 and a bag is that guy gonna stand a chance at being competitive?


Did you even read or understand what was posted in response to you? Those were special stages of things provided for a stage. Not something people were using all the time. 99 percent of the time a person like you won't show up to a match. There is always some excuse, like a scope getting worked on etc. I have showed up to that match with a crappy savage and a fixed power scope. It's fun and you might learn something.
 
#8
U mad bro?

Did you even read or understand what was posted in response to you? Those were special stages of things provided for a stage. Not something people were using all the time. 99 percent of the time a person like you won't show up to a match. There is always some excuse, like a scope getting worked on etc. I have showed up to that match with a crappy savage and a fixed power scope. It's fun and you might learn something.
 

gixxer760

Domestic Terrorist aka pa
Forum Supporter
#9
Shot a couple matches. Rule on those were if you wanted to use it on 1 stage you carried it every stage.

Most of the stages we shot were bipod and a bag. I'm guessing these photos were the more advanced stages. I wouldn't put it beside matches to have a tripod stage where there is a tripod available to use or use your own. Tactical matches often have different scenarios then a long range precision match. Hence rooftops odd angles, rope slings, tripods etc.
 
#10
None of the pictured positions are easy, and the distances are likely pretty long too.

I use a 308 without a brake, and I try to practice from crap position with improvised rests as much as I can. My place is set in hills, and I can shoot pretty far away over numerous finger canyons and draws.

When I practice, I often end up with plenty of learning opportunities (misses...) and I see that as a good thing. A typical day of practice for me would end up looking like a discrace compared to what these guys accomplish across a course - but I learn.

I have heavy professional camera tripods. I've experimented with using them for support on rough hilly positions shooting up and down hill.
Ain't easy, but there's something there.
 

Quickdraw

"Ho'old on there"
Staff member
Moderator
#11
This type of shooting is all about being presented with an obstacle and then figuring out a way to overcome that obstacle all while making shots on relatively small targets at long distances. People participate in this sport to become more competent and accomplished shooters, whether that is for competition, hunting or just general joy of the challenge.

It is pretty easy for someone to scoff at what is actually taking place in those pictures but I'd like to see that same individual attempt those same shots. They have zero understanding of the many challenges involved in making a hit under those conditions.
 

Cujo

FFI CCI
Forum Supporter
#12
Wait until you see the rifles, rests, and reloading equipment they use in F Class Open. Different discipline than above but I appreciate it all the same.

Like others have said, get out and go shoot a match. You’ll definitely learn something. The vast majority of shooters will freely exchange their knowledge and experience with you.
 
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#13
They have zero understanding of the many challenges involved in making a hit under those conditions.
Who are you referring to and how can you say that with any certainty?

Like others have said, get out and go shoot a match. You’ll definitely learn something. The vast majority of shooters will freely exchange their knowledge and experience with you.
Never shot a match personally but for the most part everyone I have come across at the range, that I know competes, has been very forthcoming with their knowledge and advice.
 
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MP15Reloader

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#15
Being one of the dudes in the pictures I will bite on the snarky comments and say it is a small part of the game on the national level.
Rock on with your lead sled and remote trigger... Those setups all include prep time, so if you can get your sled, barcalounger, and https://www.tracking-point.com/ set up in 2 minutes and get 10 impacts with 10 rounds out at 500-1000 yards on multiple targets at multiple distances on 1.5 MOA targets good on you.
I have worked with a lot of new shooters to the game and the the overwhelming comment is "this is a lot harder than I thought."
Most of the time a stage is just a bipod and a bag, but these photo's are some of the more specialized stages that are thrown at the shooters and are pretty neat photos to those of us that actually go out and shoot this stuff.
For example there are stages where a manufacturer sponsors the stage so you use their shooting sticks/tripod/rifle-mount. With that we find the best way to use the stage prop and get impacts with the gear we have to use.
If your at a location that holds local matches (Las Vegas Desert Sportsmans Rifle and Pistol Club has monthly matches) you can actually do it and see what its about. Normally the people out there at these matches will bend over backwards to help out new shooters and freely share gear... but if your a jackass out of the gate your mileage may vary.
Curious.. Cutting through all the other snarky bs in this thread from op..

In these shoots do you guys see most 6 and 6.5mm or are the .30s still prevalent? Also, as long range precision shooting is what I'm interested in but haven't got a dedicated set up.. Are there power factors or "classes" based on caliber/energy or is it open to whatever you shoot and load?
 

Quickdraw

"Ho'old on there"
Staff member
Moderator
#16
Curious.. Cutting through all the other snarky bs in this thread from op..

In these shoots do you guys see most 6 and 6.5mm or are the .30s still prevalent? Also, as long range precision shooting is what I'm interested in but haven't got a dedicated set up.. Are there power factors or "classes" based on caliber/energy or is it open to whatever you shoot and load?
In our match this past Saturday we had 22- 6.5's and 7- 6's. The 30's have fallen out of competition favor mainly due to how they fight the wind. Wind and your ability to read and correct for it is probably the biggest challenge that separates shooters. Many of the various competitions/leagues set velocity restrictions to deal with the potential for damage to match targets. The reality is though that the high energy calibers are impractical for this type of shooting as the recoil makes follow up shots more difficult and in matches that can run from 50 to over 100 rounds those calibers would just beat down someone trying to shot them. Recoil management is the primary reason that people are looking at 6mm to start with.
 
#17
It's interesting, I saw the OP as an honest question. Remember, we don't know what we don't know.

Continuing on from what MP15 was asking, are there different divisions? Like an open class for suppressor use for example .
 

Bulleteater

Big Stick policy
Forum Supporter
#19
In our match this past Saturday we had 22- 6.5's and 7- 6's. The 30's have fallen out of competition favor mainly due to how they fight the wind....
Next year, SOCOM will switch from 7.62 NATO to 6.5mm CM for their semi-auto sniper rifles [link]. Same goes for Homeland Security [link]. I imagine the effect this would have on the commercial market would be more availability and lower costs associated with that caliber.