How many people reload

TexasJackKin

Breathng Free, at last
Forum Supporter
#22
Reloading is a great "add on" hobby for shooters. Kind of like tying your own flies for fishing! I've been hand loading since sometime in the '70s, and have many firearms that have never had a factory round in them. It's a great pass time hobby, when the weather makes you want to stay inside. People talk about all the money you can save, not sure that's true, but you will shoot a lot more for about the same money...It's all good!
 
#23
I do.(y) I'm not a big gun collector which is convenient because I don't have a lot of calibers to be concerned with. So, I reload only the 3 calibers I shoot at the range a lot. to save money mostly. I don't reload for my deer rifle or, my 30carbine (altho I'm thinking about it) I usually buy those
I do enjoy it. usually, put a baseball game on or, some music. its relaxing for me.
 
#24
Reloading is a great skill to learn; it is very satisfying to me, to try and create the most reliable consistent accurate round possible. Ammunition is just one of several aspects one must have to be able to shoot sub-MOA groups.

I would recommend that one learning, should go slow, without distractions and have well defined processes. From my experience, I have seen a few "squib loads" over the years especially for pistols. A squib load is a round that does not have propellent, the force of a primer pushes the projectile into the barrel creating a HIGHLY dangerous / deadly condition when or if another round were to be fired into the blocked barrel. Unfortunately have seen the opposite when a hot / over-charged round breaches the barrel. Just to be clear, I fortunately have never had any of my ammunition have a defect like those described. I try to maintain a healthy respect to follow safe, distraction-free reloading.
 
#25
From my experience, I have seen a few "squib loads" over the years especially for pistols.
That is always my biggest fear and, the reason I try and, be diligent of the powder drop. If I'm a grain or, so over that doesn't scare me as much as I usually load to the lower end and, all my weapons are +p rated.
it's the squib.
when practicing you do several drills. many of which are the quick follow up shot. I had it happen once pheasant hunting years ago. the pellets just rolled out. I know its a shotgun so different and, it was even humorous but, it's still a thing and, the one I respect most.
 
#26
I have been wanting to get into reloading for years. Right now I am in an apartment and just don't have the space. I have still been collecting my casings to be prepared.
 
#27
I have been wanting to get into reloading for years. Right now I am in an apartment and just don't have the space. I have still been collecting my casings to be prepared.
you can do much in a small space, especially when pistol loading. many vids on youtube of guys just using a workmate ( http://www.searshometownstores.com/...pMgtpJUdOx-HOZ76yTWNj2KNrPKBPyTcaArsgEALw_wcB) type bench. I do my trimming on one.
straight walled brass is a bit less work intensive than bottleneck rifle brass. I started reloading 9mm, I still do, I save a lot of money for practice. if just for target practice load to the low end so your pistol functions correctly, your brass will last a long time. go to the Clark County shooting complex a few times ( http://www.clarkcountynv.gov/parks/Pages/clark-county-shooting-park.aspx) and, you'll get all the 9mm brass you can carry. just need to be a bit bold and, ask "hey do you mind if I pick up your brass" to the guy's next to you.
you can do it. just have to commit.
 
#28
That is a generous offer Sammy, and I may very well take you up on that. Once I figure out the best way to raise my press up a bit (I asked for help in another post about that) I will finally begin reloading. I would really appreciate someone helping me get everything set up correctly and start of the right way.
 

oly29

uber Member
#29
A lot depends on how much you really want to get into reloading. I used the Midway tumbler for years for cleaning brass and just started with the wet method using stainless steel pins. Built my own tumbler base and bought the drum online. Used angle iron bed frame for the pillow blocks and got a 36 inch 5/8 steel bar, that I cut in half and then covered them with 5/8 heater hose for the rollers.
I reload 38/357, 9MM, 222, 223/556, 30-06. Started back when primers were about 1 cent each. My last buy was 20,000 small pistol and rifle primers. Bullets are easy but powder is sometimes hard to find for the stuff I reload.
 
#30
I reload primarily handgun calibers, but started .223/5.56 almost two years ago. I can do it for about 22 cents a round, not including time. I can easily find 1000 rounds for 24 or 25 cents a round. Find it hard to justify the cleaning (that's the easy part using SS wet tumbling), inspecting, primer pock swaging (keeping swaged separate from non-swaged cases), trimming, chamfer and deburring the mouth then loading.

My main reason for reloading is to save a ton of money so we can shoot more. Being an engineer, I tend to try to get things as consistent as possible and I enjoy the challenge of building the "perfect" round. 25 years ago, .45 ACP was the cheapest caliber around. Now it's 9MM (like the .223 and 5.56, it's cheaper to buy factory). Hand loading makes .45 ACP, .380 auto, .30 M1 Carbine and .357 magnum really cheap compared to factory.

Owning a chronograph is a necessity as well as an accurate scale and powder measure.
 

BoarderMX

NRA Life Member
#31
If you reload pistol, I would suggest trying out the shooter's world D032 clean shot. It is a micro ball, meters great in a 650, I use it for .380, 9mm, .40 and 45. Pretty cheap as well at about 22.00 a pound.

For cleaning I use this model: Frankford Arsenal Platinum Series 110V 7L Rotary Tumbler and Media Separator for Cleaning and Polishing for Reloading. You can get it off amazon for around 150, it includes the media, everything but the lemshine and soap.
 

TexasJackKin

Breathng Free, at last
Forum Supporter
#32
If you reload pistol, I would suggest trying out the shooter's world D032 clean shot. It is a micro ball, meters great in a 650, I use it for .380, 9mm, .40 and 45. Pretty cheap as well at about 22.00 a pound.

For cleaning I use this model: Frankford Arsenal Platinum Series 110V 7L Rotary Tumbler and Media Separator for Cleaning and Polishing for Reloading. You can get it off amazon for around 150, it includes the media, everything but the lemshine and soap.
That's the tumbler I use, Frankfort Arsenal Rotating Tumbler..... or F.A.R.T. for short!

Works great, I got some larger pins than the ones it came with, it makes separating the pins MUCH easier!
 
#33
That's the tumbler I use, Frankfort Arsenal Rotating Tumbler..... or F.A.R.T. for short!

Works great, I got some larger pins than the ones it came with, it makes separating the pins MUCH easier!
Same here, TexasJack, not about the pins, though. I use a Lyman media separator. Piece of cake.
 

LASCHRIS

Life is hard enough. It's harder when your stupid
#34
great info! this should be a sticky! I'd like to start reloading .223 sometime down the road. i dont have the money to invest right now, but its on the scope for later
I second for a reloading sticky. With the libTARD politicians trying to take over the state, it will only be a matter of time for Nevada to be East California. Do primers and powder have an expiration date?
 

LASCHRIS

Life is hard enough. It's harder when your stupid
#35
Gee, I didn't realize I had so much power to make someone move moderate. (what ever that means) What I was referring to was the great ammo shortage when Obama was in power. Rolling your own may become the only way to obtain ammo.
 

MP15Reloader

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#36
Been reloading for 5 years.. Press has been mostly idle for 6 months + due to schedule.

Reloaded 223 308 7mm rem mag 9mm

Quit 9mm over a year ago because of price and availability. 223 loads are now only 77 grain or 62 grain bthp specialty loads for myself.

308 loads are the same, bthp or ballistic tips and 7mm is strictly for hunting. No point in cranking out 55 grain plinking rounds or 9mm plinkers when i cant justify very little if any savings vs the time spent.

Think the only way id pick back up again is with a new purchase in a niche or high priced caliber, 6.5mm for example. I do miss it now and again but honestly i exhausted my 223 and 308 options and 9mm is pretty straight forward. Unless theres another shortage, the dillon will continue to gather dust for the most part but i will never sell it, just in case.