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Do It Yourself Gun Wipes




#1
All right, I'll admit I'm cheap. But I get sick and tired for paying $5 and $6 for a Silicone cotton / flannel gun wipe cloth. I go through these things pretty quick. It doesn't take long before they wear, then they transfer a lot of lint on to your gun. Especially on any matte finished surfaces.

So I went to a fabric store and bought 2 yards of cotton flannel quilting fabric for just $2.49 @ yard. (I bought natural color. But you can get it in any color you like). I took a pair of pinking shears and cut it into 18" square sheets. I then spray them with silicone, (or you can use your favorite gun oil or rust preventive), fold them up and put them into 6" heavy duty zip lock storage bags. You'll end up with over 20 of them for what you will pay for one from Hoppe's or Outers. And they are of better quality.

You can keep several of them at home, in your range bag, on your reloading bench, or even in the pockets of your gun cases. Then you will never be without a way to wipe down your gun. And you won't be ripped off over paying for those crappy one's they sell at the gun shop.

https://www.joann.com/cozy-flannel-...v2=Whites&icn=hpz1ba&ici=cozy-flannel&start=1

https://www.walmart.com/ip/6-x-6-4-Mil-Heavy-Duty-Plastic-Reclosable-Zipper-Bags/107397076
 
#3
One thing I have started doing that helps A LOT, is after cleaning, oiling, and wiping down, I allow the gun to sit for 48 hours with the muzzle down over a paper towel. (You can place it into a gun case with a piece of paper towel wrapped around the muzzle to prevent anything from soaking into the case itself). Then lean it against a corner of the room.

This allows any and all excess oil, solvent, and liquid to drain down out of the action, through the barrel into the paper towel. You'll be surprised at how much runs out. This prevents this excess liquid and lubricant from running into the action and soaking into the wood surrounding it. I even do it with AR's and other synthetic stocked weapons. Then after 48 hours, store the weapon normally.
 

TexasJackKin

Breathng Free, at last
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#4
Nice, I like that idea! Now if someone could just figure out how to make those lead wipes, the ones you push though the bore to remove lead, That would be great! I haven't had any luck finding the pure copper wool pads, that work also. (Sorry, hope this isn't a thread hijack)
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
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#5
I use micro fiber cloth from wal mart for my silicon wipe cloths, low cost, works well, no fuzz when it wears, which takes a long time with this type of cloth.
Copper wool, and bronze wool are both available at ACE hardware and Home Depot, you just have to find an employee who knows where they hide it.
They also carry fine mesh copper and bronze screen, get the proper size arch punch and you can duplicate the Lewis Lead Remover system that Brownells carries, but a lot cheaper.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#9
For the arch punches, I use 1/4" for .22's and .25's, 5/16 for .30 and .32's, 3/8 for .380, 9mm, .38 and .357, 7/16 for .40, .41 and 10 mm, loose fit in the .44 spl and .44 mag ( a bit tight, sometimes I have to trim the edges of the punched out disk with a pair of scissors) and 1/2 for the .44 spl and mag and .45s (tight fit, sometimes have to trim as I said).
For .50 the 1/2 is usually OK, if it's too loose I go up to the 9/16 and trim to fit.
A 5/8 works well on 20 gauge, and 11/16 or 3/4 for 12 gauge. Those are all pretty common sizes, arch punches are sometimes called hollow punches (although that really is a different type of punch, but the result is the same) and you can get a set at Harbor Freight that works very well for making these screen disks, here it is:

Hollow Punches.jpg

https://www.harborfreight.com/9-piece-hollow-punch-set-3838.html
The HF ones are hollow punches, this is a true arch punch
ARCH PUNCH.jpg
https://www.walmart.com/ip/General-...=sem&msclkid=8f09d09b1cb4137624418b613d067c90


Hollow punches are pretty easy to make too, even without a lathe. A drill press, some drill bits, steel round stock, and a grinder and you can get it done, although the lathe is the easier way to go.
 
#10
I just cut up 4 yards of cotton flannel material I bought yesterday for $13.00. It yielded a total of 45 one foot square wiping cloths. I have 36 heavy duty 8 mil zip lock bags coming next week, so I can individually treat and package them. 45 treated gun wiping cloths at $5.50 each would run $247.50. These will most likely last longer than I will.

I'll treat them with different oils and rust preventatives. Then mark them on the bags. You can put motor oil in a trigger spray bottle to apply it. It works pretty well. Then allow them to soak it up for a few minutes. Then fold and package them, and you're good to go.
 

NYECOGunsmith

Obsessed Member
Staff member
Moderator
#11
I use the OTIS pull through cleaning system for a lot of my guns, especially shotguns, , but those round patches that come with it with the three radially spaced slits are expensive when you run out of the initial supply.

So I buy cotton twill cloth at Wal Mart (about $4 a yard) and use an arch punch and soft block of pine, plus a hammer, to cut out a bunch of the appropriate sized round patches.

For the slits in them I just made up a punch that I stick in the 20 ton hydraulic press. Drop a bunch of the patches into a short length of PVC pipe to keep them together and run the punch down through the pipe into a block of pine with the press and I get a bunch of ready to go patches for about 1/20th the cost of the purchased ones.
The cotton twill does a better job of scrubbing the bore, and with that rubber donut on the OTIS system for shotguns, it really gets a smoothbore bright and shiny clean fast, drags out the lead and plastic wad fouling very fast.
 

Tophog

Biker Trailer Trash
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#12
I use the OTIS pull through cleaning system for a lot of my guns, especially shotguns, , but those round patches that come with it with the three radially spaced slits are expensive when you run out of the initial supply.

So I buy cotton twill cloth at Wal Mart (about $4 a yard) and use an arch punch and soft block of pine, plus a hammer, to cut out a bunch of the appropriate sized round patches.

For the slits in them I just made up a punch that I stick in the 20 ton hydraulic press. Drop a bunch of the patches into a short length of PVC pipe to keep them together and run the punch down through the pipe into a block of pine with the press and I get a bunch of ready to go patches for about 1/20th the cost of the purchased ones.
The cotton twill does a better job of scrubbing the bore, and with that rubber donut on the OTIS system for shotguns, it really gets a smoothbore bright and shiny clean fast, drags out the lead and plastic wad fouling very fast.
So it seems that a minor investment in arch punches, hammers, PVC pipe, bronze and copper mesh, microfiber cloths, a 20 ton press and a lathe will save me a couple bucks at the local gun store.

Good to know. :rolleyes:
 

Tophog

Biker Trailer Trash
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#14
NYECOGunsmith said:
. . . the odds are pretty good that you will end up injuring yourself with one or more of those tools!
You know me too well. Good thing I have VA. :p
 
#15
Just something else I thought I would pass along. I came across these VCI, (Vapor Corrosion Inhibiting), rust inhibiting papers I found on Amazon. They are a very good buy for just $10.15 for 1,000, 4" X 4" square sheets. If you keep them in a ziplock plastic bag they will last for years.

If you keep 1 or 2 inside pistol and long gun cases they will do a fantastic job preventing rust. They are also good to put inside reloading die boxes, and tool chests. They are the same type of corrosion inhibiting paper as what many gun companies like Smith & Wesson ship with their firearms.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KF57W56/ref=od_aui_detailpages00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 
#16
My VCI Protective Papers arrived from Armor Protective Packaging yesterday. They are 4" X 4", or about the size of a large "Post It". They came wrapped in paper, inside another box. I removed them and broke them up into small stacks of about 200 each, (They come 1,000 to a pack), and placed them into heavy gauge zip lock plastic bags to protect them from evaporation.

They are a perfect size to keep several inside gun cases, tool boxes, etc. I E-Mailed Armor Protective Packaging and they told me they offer over 2 years of protection against rust. They are not oily, and look like regular heavy gauge paper. The aerospace industry uses these, as do many firearms manufacturers to protect their products against rust and corrosion during shipping. For just $10.00 for 1,000 sheets, it is a good, economical way to protect your guns from rust.
 
#17
A lot of good ideas here. I’m relocating my reloading bench inside the house and part of that bench is a cleaning space. I like the idea of draining the gun of any excess liquids, so I will add a way to hang the gun vertical muzzle down. Thanks for the tips