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Any Need or Interest for Some Lead/Tin Combo Metal for Bullet Casting?

Ron_O

Cave Dweller
#1
I'm not sure if this is a good material for casting bullets or not, but I have a few hundred pounds of some metal that is half lead and half tin that comes from some old church pipe organ pipes. We deal with a lot of churches and buy or dismantle old organ equipment for the churches in general. Some of the pipes aren't reusable but because of their mixed composition the scrap yards don't know how to process them to price them accordingly.

Tin in general (the element, not tin cans) is pretty valuable but lead not so much. Some of the guys like some tin in their bullets but I'm not sure if up to 50% is too much. If you think it'll work I'll put up an ad and some pics for it. But if you wanted only 25%, for example, you could mix this with pure lead to reduce the overall tin content. I had the metal content tested locally and they assessed it at 50% tin/lead.

Any suggestions are welcome!
 
#2
I'm not sure if this is a good material for casting bullets or not, but I have a few hundred pounds of some metal that is half lead and half tin that comes from some old church pipe organ pipes. We deal with a lot of churches and buy or dismantle old organ equipment for the churches in general. Some of the pipes aren't reusable but because of their mixed composition the scrap yards don't know how to process them to price them accordingly.

Tin in general (the element, not tin cans) is pretty valuable but lead not so much. Some of the guys like some tin in their bullets but I'm not sure if up to 50% is too much. If you think it'll work I'll put up an ad and some pics for it. But if you wanted only 25%, for example, you could mix this with pure lead to reduce the overall tin content. I had the metal content tested locally and they assessed it at 50% tin/lead.

Any suggestions are welcome!
How much will you be asking for your lead/tin?
 
#3
How much will you be asking for your lead/tin?
Pricing is still a question. We had it all sold to an organ builder who said he'd been paying $13 a pound for tin alone and around $1 a pound for lead, plus shipping. He was going to buy it all for $5 a pound a couple of years ago. But then his business went flat so he had to hold off (we stay in touch). We've done a lot of business over the years.

Not sure what would be fair for these purposes. I may have to go online to see if it's offered elsewhere and at what cost. Wanted to come here first. Could probably go on eBay or something to see what kind of interest it generates.

Where would you need to be on price?
 
#4
For casting you would certainly need to adjust the ratio. Usually right around 2% tin is the target for casting bullets. The 50-50 blend might be to brittle and or wouldn't size well in a sizer. Not sure though as i've never dealt with that high of a ratio.

Is this already in ingot form or is it in it's original (pipe) form? That would help determine pricing.
 
#5
For casting you would certainly need to adjust the ratio. Usually right around 2% tin is the target for casting bullets. The 50-50 blend might be to brittle and or wouldn't size well in a sizer. Not sure though as i've never dealt with that high of a ratio.

Is this already in ingot form or is it in it's original (pipe) form? That would help determine pricing.
Still in crushed pipe form, pipes compressed and folded up and placed in a box. That allows for weighing out desired amounts rather than just a large ingot. You can also cut small sections out and melt them down as needed.

2% is a pretty light number! But I've never cast bullets so really have no idea. But this metal is not at all brittle, it's soft. Step on the pipes to flatten them out, bend them by hand into smaller sections. If someone wants to come by and pick up a small section to experiment with so you can report back to the group then you're more than welcome. I'm on the south end of town near the South Point casino.
 
#7
Lead and tin ARE NOT brittle they are both quite soft, in the ratio that the OP is talking about 50/50 you would be lucky to get a bullet that soft to shoot from a gun and if you did hit anything hard or soft it would mushroom more than a standard cast bullet. Antimony is the material that hardens lead and tin to be able to use them for bullets. Tin lets the mixture flow and fill out the casting molds better. It is also more expensive than the other two and using any thing more than 4% tin is just wasting money. 2% is the norm for most cast bullets. 6% antimony and 92% lead.
 
#8
Lead and tin ARE NOT brittle they are both quite soft, in the ratio that the OP is talking about 50/50 you would be lucky to get a bullet that soft to shoot from a gun and if you did hit anything hard or soft it would mushroom more than a standard cast bullet. Antimony is the material that hardens lead and tin to be able to use them for bullets. Tin lets the mixture flow and fill out the casting molds better. It is also more expensive than the other two and using any thing more than 4% tin is just wasting money. 2% is the norm for most cast bullets. 6% antimony and 92% lead.
Apparently you didn’t understand my brittle comment. When I talk about a bullet being brittle I’m talking about the lead breaking up instead of expanding. If you’ve ever shot Linotype and shot it into media or an animal you would notice that they will break up if hitting bone. Softer lead like the ratio you described also referred to Lyman #2 is more maliable. It will expand and when impacting bone it will hold together. I have been casting for many many years. I’ve tried many different lead combinations and have shot them at high and lower velocities.
 
#10
Question for warboar. In your opnion are lead ingots a good investment?
If you cast bullets then yes.
As an actual way to make money I don’t think it would be a great investment. Unless you get it free. I’ve known a few guys who were given sailboat keels that netted several tons of lead. Took them many years to sell it off and a lot of hours to cut it and melt it down to manageable ingots to sell.

I buy lead at about #100 at a time. I usually have a couple hundred pounds and a typical casting session I’ll cast 20-40 pounds of various handgun and 45-70 bullets.