Another gun forum, another state, gouger





johnthomas

Henderson
Forum Supporter
#1
I normally pass by things like this, but sometimes when you see it, you have to say something, lol
Make: izhevsk

Model: M44 Mosin Nagant carbine

Caliber: 7.62x54R

Price: $600
 

Tophog

Biker Trailer Trash
Staff member
Moderator
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2019 Supporter
#2
That is subjective and has been discussed here before. If he finds someone willing to pay it, oh well.

If it was a necessity like water or food, it could be gouging.

Check out 'classic car' online sellers. Some suckers pay $20k or more over realistic prices.
 

johnthomas

Henderson
Forum Supporter
#3
I get your point. If it is worth it to someone to overpay, it is their problem. If it were food or water in a disaster, the law would step in after the fact.
 

titanNV

NRA Endowment Member
Staff member
Administrator
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#4
Those Mosins aren't nearly as cheap as they were 10 yearsago. But, I couldn't see $600 unless it was super special or unissued
 
#5
Seller is a dreamer.

Only way he is getting $600 is if the sale includes 2 full spam cans of surplus ammo, in which case, the price is fair.

The free market will sort this out.

It's not gouging.

It's just someone who doesn't know the value of his firearm.

See plenty of for sale ads like that on Armslist, and occasionally on this forum.

If it sells, more power to him.


Unless the seller asks for pricing advice, it is not anybody's business to tell them what they think the item is worth.

In the days of Backpage, which was full of trolls due to the anonymity, SEVERAL times I got anonymous emails from losers saying my item was overpriced, usually in an insulting manner. For the record, EVERY item I ever listed there sold for within 10% of my initial price, usually within 2-3 weeks tops. Too many petty fools don't understand the free market, and get angry when they can't afford an item. Too bad. Tough luck.
One case in particular, I have mentioned on this forum, I listed a fairly rare firearm. The next morning I got an anonymous email that said simply: "fuk you and fuk your price". Nice. The gun sold for my full asking price 4 days later. So fuk the loser who didn't understand gun values, the free market, and was so immature that he felt the need to send an anonymous email sniveling about my price.

As always, YMMV.
 
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jfrey123

I aim to misbehave...
Staff member
Moderator
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2019 Supporter
#6
I always ask high because of the inevitable 50% offer. Throw a Glock up for $300 and some jerk will offer you $200 and act like he’s doing you a favor.

I’d be curious to see if the Mosin is worked up at all or just bone stock and still dripping cosmoline.
 

Felid'Maximus

Beware of Cat
Forum Supporter
#9
People who use the term "price gouging" are more annoying to me than any price a seller sets. I am a huge fan of the free market and believe all participants should strive to buy items as cheaply as possible and sell for as high as possible, whether it is for water/food or for toys. That's the way the economy functions the best.

Price ceilings on food and water result in shortages, which is a far worse outcome than the "unfairness" of rich people being served first. Poor people get water and food faster when rich people get their water and food first. This isn't the favored outcome for Marxists, but this is the reality that exists when studying places in the world where shortages of food and water exist. Every time the government goes after gougers, you are making it so that poor people will possibly wait a week or longer to get the same things they would have probably gotten in days. Why? Because money being provided for the service of bringing in essential goods is a driving motivator to bring in such goods. Imagine you are a guy with a motorcycle and a gallon jug of water. Will you drive 100 miles at $100 per gallon of water? What if water is fixed at $3 per gallon, will you drive 100 miles to deliver it? If you have a water truck, maybe you'll come at $3 per gallon from 30 miles away, but what about from 3000 miles away? When water floods the market, the price will drop as those willing to pay more buy their shares. Once the water truck is already there, if he runs out of people buying water for $10/gallon, he will rather lower his price to sell his product than drive back home with unsold product. Eventually the value of water will reach equilibrium at a pretty low value, but if water is set so low that there is no economic incentive to bring it, you are waiting for charity causes and the government to provide which means everyone must wait. And if these forces do bring scarce goods after the free market has already supplied the richer elements, that also means they don't need to bring as much as they would have if they had to bear the full brunt of it. Is it not a waste of public resources to hand out free, scarce water to rich folks who have plenty of money to buy it from a premium source?

The Marxist motto: "It is better that we all starve together than for a rich person to eat a minute sooner!"
 
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#10
^Well stated Felid.

An excellent example that should be taught in public grade school.

Too bad there is no time in the curriculum due to the heavy course load of "cultural enrichment studies".
 

tuolumnejim

Very Active Member
Forum Supporter
#11
Do you have an M44?

I'll generously double your money and give you $160.

;)


OP never provided a link, would be curious if any extras (like ammo) were included in the sale, etc.
As a milsurp collector/shooter, it is very common for Mosins to come with ammo, often a lot of ammo.
Nope I do not have one, and I didn't buy them when they were 69.00 bucks either I saw zero value.
 
#13
Nope I do not have one, and I didn't buy them when they were 69.00 bucks either I saw zero value.

When they were that cheap, I turned up my nose and walked by the barrels of them.

Took a couple of decades before I realized how much fun old milsurps were to shoot - the historical link makes them even more interesting and fun, IMO.

Personally I have no use for the glut of $400 AR rifles that are so abundant today. Only own one high end AR, and several other black rifles.

One man's trash is another man's treasure.
 

tuolumnejim

Very Active Member
Forum Supporter
#14
When they were that cheap, I turned up my nose and walked by the barrels of them.

Took a couple of decades before I realized how much fun old milsurps were to shoot - the historical link makes them even more interesting and fun, IMO.

Personally I have no use for the glut of $400 AR rifles that are so abundant today. Only own one high end AR, and several other black rifles.

One man's trash is another man's treasure.
Very true, hell I used to see barrels full of .30 carbines for 50.00 a piece and I would walk by and laugh wondering what moron would pay that much for one. :ROFLMAO:

I only have the one AR that I just recently assembled but I do shoot lots of Military stuff, I caught the AK building bug a long time ago and then the twin 1919's are a blast.
 

MP15Reloader

Obsessed Member
Forum Supporter
#17
In the same boat.. mosins were plenty and cheap when I got into shooting about 15 years ago, even aks werent passing 500 unless it was a higher end import. Now I have 7 ar15s built 6 one high end purchased and I’m looking at aks, 30 carbines for over $600...

I still haven’t got into milsurp but 8mm interests me and so does any milsurp in 6.5x55. Hope prices fall so I can pick one up. Still can’t part with my money for the prices today.