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Ammunition Without it, guns are nothing more than expensive paperweights.

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Old 01-19-2018, 05:30 AM   #11
Bravo
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Default Storing Ammunition

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Originally Posted by jay View Post
Diito on the temperature equalization before storing tip. And vacuum bagging IMHO is way more "durable" than storing in gasket sealed containers. If you can store gasket sealed containers in temperature stable conditions then that's a big plus but temperature swings will make the pressure inside go both higher and lower than outside the container and eventually many of these containers will go through the cycle of bleeding a bit out then sucking a bit in. In extreme conditions, warm relatively humid sucked in air will condense out liquid water when cooled down and whoa! Magic puddles.

In less extreme conditions you have new moisture and oxygen coming in to feed existing rust.

So yeah - vacuuming bagging for the win.
Just be careful with bullet setback with vacuum sealing

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Old 01-19-2018, 07:34 AM   #12
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just listen to nyeco, he has been storing ammo for 3000+ years, so he knows his s**t!
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Old 01-19-2018, 07:44 AM   #13
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Default Storing Ammunition

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just listen to nyeco, he has been storing ammo for 3000+ years, so he knows his s**t!
I wouldn't doubt it, I use the same vacuum sealing method myself, it's good as long as you don't overdo the vacuuming and cause setback

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Old 01-19-2018, 06:59 PM   #14
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Plenty of knowledge, logic and wisdom in NYECO (and others) thoughts and recommendations regarding optimum storage of ammunition. Educational.

As a side note. Just last week, or the week before a post disparaged NS as a source for technical information. Iíve only been with NS a bit over two years and have read numerous posts based on technical knowledge, detailed experience, and both a general and specific willingness to assist NS members with small arms issuesÖ
- IMHO, NS is a valued resource (technical and hands on knowledge) for all, available simply for the asking.

Interesting conundrum to consider and manage the concept of excessive vacuum WRT the bullet. Believe NYECO recommendation most ideal, in particular when moisture, temperature swings and less than ideal storage is available.


With above in mind, the military stores small arms ammunition in magazines around the world in ammo cans for years, decades, without vacuum sealing, nitrogen, etc. Nor does the military use desiccant in small arms ammunition cans. They do place a humidity indicator in ammo cans that reflect highest humidity in the can. I recall 20%, 30% and 40%. If humidity gets to either value, it turns pink. Again, as I recall 30% thresh hold (in the can) for concern by military. Otherwise they are blue and OK.

40+ years Active and civilian Naval Ordnance service. Very, very rare small arms ammo was discovered with corrosion. Exception were normally when ammo was in outside storage or a storage magazine was inadvertently flooded. (Squids do that occasionally)


Thus far, for my use, typical home HVAC, ammo cans in most environmentally stable carpeted closet in the house. Only metal (no plastic) ammo cans in excellent condition used. Ammo cans have good gaskets, and ability to seal securely. Ammo remains in original box or loose / bulk ammo never touches metal can (cardboard lined ammo can).

Perhaps thus far I have been lucky, no corrosion on my ammo that Iíve noted over the years. If that changes, Iíll apply NYECO recommendations, with particular attention to bullet setback. Many variables to consider and apply best ammo storage solution for individuals and their local environment, realities for them.

Brad
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Old 01-20-2018, 01:47 AM   #15
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I agree whole heartedly with everything you said, Brad.

I should have noted that my statements in regards to ammo storage were for extreme conditions.

In a previous life, I/we frequently had to store caches of ammunition, weapons, etc. and by vacuum packing them, with desiccant, in air tight containers purged with an inert gas, we were going all out to ensure that everything would survive the environment where the goods were being cached.

Stored like that, as long as the container doesn't rust through, you could store it under water (we did that a few times) for years with no ill effects.

As for my having been storing ammo for 3,000 plus years, it goes back longer than that, every time you step on some gravel, GW, you are walking on my ammo storage from the "real old days", it holds up just fine, rain, shine, wind, snow, floods, no problem at all. When you are ready to load your sling or catapult or trebuchet, the ammo is good to go no matter how long it has been stored!

Not long before I retired, I fired a number of magazines through a Thompson SMG, a BAR, an M1 Carbine, a M3 Grease Gun, and a 1911(different mags GW, different mags!) that had been loaded early in WWII and left in storage for 60+ years.

All fed without malfunction, all the rounds fired on the first primer strike.

I have several cases of 1914 through 1917 vintage 30's06 ammo, and once in a while I fire a few rounds of it, none has ever failed to go off on the first try. It has always been stored in a cool, dry environment, and I expect it may well be good for another 100 years. It's in wooden crates inside cardboard boxes, GI ammo.

Coiled springs only take ONE set, that is the one that occurs the first time they are compressed, and the spring designer takes that into consideration when selecting the wire diameter for the spring, the coil spacing, the amount of energy required to be stored, and the compressed as well as expanded lengths.

They do get some what shorter (or longer, depending on the spring type) with use, but what wears out a coiled spring is the number of compression and expansion cycles it goes through, not being left compressed for a long period of time.

Flat springs, and V- springs, are another matter altogether however.

Those will take a set and fail if left compressed for a long period of time.

Leaving your buffalo hide or giant prehistoric ground sloth "Davy and Goliath" sling out in the rain or sun will cause it to take a set, however, which is why I made mine out of Stegosaurus hide, doesn't take a set no matter how hot, cold or wet it gets.
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Old 01-20-2018, 02:54 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ka Lbo View Post
Every couple years I wipe the ammo can rubber gasket/seal with a rag, then apply a thin coat of Vaseline to keep the rubber gasket/seal moist.

Just my thoughts and logic. May be helpful to someone.

Brad
Just for information Vaseline and other types of petroleum lubes will in time soften and dissolve many types of rubber seals. A very thin film of silicon grease is what you want to use.
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Old 01-20-2018, 03:09 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by 28kfps View Post
Just for information Vaseline and other types of petroleum lubes will in time soften and dissolve many types of rubber seals. A very thin film of silicon grease is what you want to use.

Thank you for that info regarding silicone grease is a better choice.

Brad
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