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Old 01-10-2018, 04:08 AM   #61
Clockwork
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Originally Posted by turbobrick View Post
Iím a huge fan of Nosler Accubonds for hunting. I buy off the shelf, usually the AB Long Range loading for sighting in a new rifle, then I reload that brass with AB LR projectiles for re-zeroing and hunting. We collectively harvested 10 deer/speed goats in the last few years, all with Accubonds in 3 different calibers and have had no animal take more than a couple steps. Any of the premium hunting projectiles should perform similarly.


I feel the ammo is going to be you get what you pay for (up to a point). Iíll have to look for the ammo you mentioned in store and see the price. Some of these boxes of 20 are expensive, 90$/box.
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Old 01-10-2018, 04:13 AM   #62
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I feel you man. I really wish they took me out also. When did you take your hunters ed course? What do you plan on hunting?
We actually took our hunters ed early last year, I ended up getting a new job and put off a lot of things, so 2018 is the year hopefully we get back into it, or at least me. As for what to hunt, I was thinking white tail/mule deer would be my ideal choice.
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Old 01-10-2018, 09:02 PM   #63
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We actually took our hunters ed early last year, I ended up getting a new job and put off a lot of things, so 2018 is the year hopefully we get back into it, or at least me. As for what to hunt, I was thinking white tail/mule deer would be my ideal choice.


Nice! Thatís awesome to hear. Mule deer would be fun as hell to hunt I think. I really cant wait to actually get out there and experience it.
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Old 01-19-2018, 07:45 PM   #64
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Congrats on getting into the sport! I literally used to LIVE to go big game hunting each year. I'd have dreams about it at night for decades. Such a challenge as well as experience. A lot of people don't get how refreshing and fulfilling it is just to get out in the wilderness and connect with nature while big game hunting.

I grew up in the Pacific NW. A family friend convinced my dad to get us boys into hunting, both bird and big game. Pheasant, duck, goose, quail, chucker, dove, rabbit, coyote, bear, deer, and elk. Still haven't been moose or antelope hunting, nor goat or sheep, but mostly because I didn't want to put in for the tags ($$). Wild boar hunting is great in some areas and my buddies in California used to hit Catalina Island regularly to hunt pigs. The bear tags were accessories to deer or elk; never been on a dedicated bear hunt. Have seen several but only ever shot at one which was running up a hill.

In 1988 I moved my family to Wyoming, just outside Yellowstone Park. Needless to say I got pretty spoiled. Did a lot of hunting in Washington, Utah, Colorado, and California before then. Never hunted Nevada. We had an extra freezer to hold our wild game. My kids were raised on it.

I used to look at big game as 'free meat', though it never was, but it was super healthy to eat if nothing else. We'd tent camp or I'd sleep in my 4x4 in remote areas. You really learn where the game likes to hang out, as well as their habits. Whenever I road trip I'm constantly looking at the terrain and imagining what's living where, drooling over places I'd love to hunt. A trip into Idaho while eclipse viewing rang deafening gongs off in my head while riding through the mountains, reminding me that it's time to move back into big game country because I miss it so much.

We started out tent and RV camping in a remote area in Eastern Washington state while mule deer hunting. The deer would head for high ground during the day and feed and drink far below at night. We'd leave camp at 4 AM and hike up to our intercept point in one of the several mountain saddles above, a natural crossing point for deer. As daylight came, up came the deer, sometimes pressured by other hunters below. We've had them literally split their herd to walk around us because they were downwind and couldn't smell us until they passed. I could have stuffed a bayonet into them! Deer are colorblind and won't recognize you if you're not moving and they can't smell you.

I later took up archery hunting to avoid the crowds and that made a true hunter out of me. No more 150 yard shots while stalking in open forest, they had to be close. That REALLY taught me to be aware of the wind.

Scouting helps but sometimes it's just too far away to head up to scout before the season. I used to research the prior year's harvest reports to see which areas were best to hunt. It was always a let down to shoot an animal on opening morning of the hunt because the season was OVER!! One time I took two bucks in Northern CA in the first hour of the season.

Time to head home.

Elk are another matter. They cover a lot of ground and can be a dozen miles away by the following morning. Some of the best meat you'll ever harvest will be a cow elk! If you're not worried about a wall hanger then jump on a cow whenever possible!

If it's in your budget the best advice I can give you, if you don't draw a remote tag here in Nevada, is to go out of state to an area that has plentiful game. Wyoming and Montana come to mind. In Wyoming it wasn't about finding something to shoot, it was about picking the best animal to shoot. I hunted the north and south forks of the Shoshone River outside Yellowstone but the areas NE of Dubois are epic (as is most of Wyoming).

You can probably find a local who'll guide you or give you access to your land if you're diligent. Often times paying a rancher a nominal fee will get you into some epic hunting.

Regarding the price of ammo, it's pretty much moot in general when compared to the other money you'll be spending in the sport. Once my rifle was sighted in, a single box of 20 shells would last me several hunting seasons. Most shots are going to be under 300 yards so having precision match grade sub-MOA ammo isn't going to be necessary. A couple of inches in a big deer or elk's kill zone isn't going to matter. Do a shoulder shot if in doubt, though it'll ruin some good meat.

I'm currently researching a new rifle but this time I'm going bigger than my previous 30-06. I want to do some ultra long range hunting. The furthest I've dropped anything is in the 400 yard range. Never shot out farther than that as far as I remember.

My advice: Find an area that's great big game habitat, get to some high ground early, keep the wind in your favor, and hunt downhill whenever possible if ridge hunting isn't producing anything. The wind tends to blow uphill during the day and downhill in the evening. Deer and elk tend to watch the downhill slopes for danger, not above them. But I prefer to stalk hunt rather than wait to be approached because I'm easily bored and it gets cold. That's where sound and wind are big factors.

Deer will bed down during the day but you can still find them. It's most fun to hunt during the rut if possible, such as you can do in states like Wyoming during some seasons. Bucks in the rut are crazy and will be walking around all day looking to breed. When bow hunting you can call bull elk in during the rut; always an adventure! Big ass animals when they're within 20 yards of you!

Wear SILENT fabrics if possible, something that won't make noise when rubbing up against a branch or while your legs rub together. Keep your feet warm. I prefer the light weight camo binoculars in a 10 or 12 power with the widest range of view. Full size binocs are HEAVY. I've done spotting scopes but they get heavy and awkward if hiking in so I use my scope when needed. I prefer a day pack to hunt from camp or my vehicle rather than a full sized backpack. KNOW the weather report. I quarter elk out and make several trips or drag a deer whole after gutting it (that's where it's great to be heading back DOWNHILL).

As soon as you take an animal, bleed it out and then gut it out. Cooling that meat off is a priority. Get it hung up in a cool place ASAP, skinning it out if you didn't do it in the field, further helping it too cool off. Make sure you have a game bag to protect the meat as it hangs in camp. If you carry it out on your back be sure the antlers or horns aren't positioned such that another hunter will mistake you for a live animal. Orange strips or white cloth over the head or horns will help.

I usually hunt alone but having a hunting buddy is great, for a lot of different reasons.

Lots more to add but enough for now! Great prep makes for great hunting! Get an elevation topo map if hunting in a strange area. Warm comfortable layered clothing. Plenty of water.
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Old 01-21-2018, 03:21 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by Ron_O View Post
Congrats on getting into the sport! I literally used to LIVE to go big game hunting each year. I'd have dreams about it at night for decades. Such a challenge as well as experience. A lot of people don't get how refreshing and fulfilling it is just to get out in the wilderness and connect with nature while big game hunting.

I grew up in the Pacific NW. A family friend convinced my dad to get us boys into hunting, both bird and big game. Pheasant, duck, goose, quail, chucker, dove, rabbit, coyote, bear, deer, and elk. Still haven't been moose or antelope hunting, nor goat or sheep, but mostly because I didn't want to put in for the tags ($$). Wild boar hunting is great in some areas and my buddies in California used to hit Catalina Island regularly to hunt pigs. The bear tags were accessories to deer or elk; never been on a dedicated bear hunt. Have seen several but only ever shot at one which was running up a hill.

In 1988 I moved my family to Wyoming, just outside Yellowstone Park. Needless to say I got pretty spoiled. Did a lot of hunting in Washington, Utah, Colorado, and California before then. Never hunted Nevada. We had an extra freezer to hold our wild game. My kids were raised on it.

I used to look at big game as 'free meat', though it never was, but it was super healthy to eat if nothing else. We'd tent camp or I'd sleep in my 4x4 in remote areas. You really learn where the game likes to hang out, as well as their habits. Whenever I road trip I'm constantly looking at the terrain and imagining what's living where, drooling over places I'd love to hunt. A trip into Idaho while eclipse viewing rang deafening gongs off in my head while riding through the mountains, reminding me that it's time to move back into big game country because I miss it so much.

We started out tent and RV camping in a remote area in Eastern Washington state while mule deer hunting. The deer would head for high ground during the day and feed and drink far below at night. We'd leave camp at 4 AM and hike up to our intercept point in one of the several mountain saddles above, a natural crossing point for deer. As daylight came, up came the deer, sometimes pressured by other hunters below. We've had them literally split their herd to walk around us because they were downwind and couldn't smell us until they passed. I could have stuffed a bayonet into them! Deer are colorblind and won't recognize you if you're not moving and they can't smell you.

I later took up archery hunting to avoid the crowds and that made a true hunter out of me. No more 150 yard shots while stalking in open forest, they had to be close. That REALLY taught me to be aware of the wind.

Scouting helps but sometimes it's just too far away to head up to scout before the season. I used to research the prior year's harvest reports to see which areas were best to hunt. It was always a let down to shoot an animal on opening morning of the hunt because the season was OVER!! One time I took two bucks in Northern CA in the first hour of the season.

Time to head home.

Elk are another matter. They cover a lot of ground and can be a dozen miles away by the following morning. Some of the best meat you'll ever harvest will be a cow elk! If you're not worried about a wall hanger then jump on a cow whenever possible!

If it's in your budget the best advice I can give you, if you don't draw a remote tag here in Nevada, is to go out of state to an area that has plentiful game. Wyoming and Montana come to mind. In Wyoming it wasn't about finding something to shoot, it was about picking the best animal to shoot. I hunted the north and south forks of the Shoshone River outside Yellowstone but the areas NE of Dubois are epic (as is most of Wyoming).

You can probably find a local who'll guide you or give you access to your land if you're diligent. Often times paying a rancher a nominal fee will get you into some epic hunting.

Regarding the price of ammo, it's pretty much moot in general when compared to the other money you'll be spending in the sport. Once my rifle was sighted in, a single box of 20 shells would last me several hunting seasons. Most shots are going to be under 300 yards so having precision match grade sub-MOA ammo isn't going to be necessary. A couple of inches in a big deer or elk's kill zone isn't going to matter. Do a shoulder shot if in doubt, though it'll ruin some good meat.

I'm currently researching a new rifle but this time I'm going bigger than my previous 30-06. I want to do some ultra long range hunting. The furthest I've dropped anything is in the 400 yard range. Never shot out farther than that as far as I remember.

My advice: Find an area that's great big game habitat, get to some high ground early, keep the wind in your favor, and hunt downhill whenever possible if ridge hunting isn't producing anything. The wind tends to blow uphill during the day and downhill in the evening. Deer and elk tend to watch the downhill slopes for danger, not above them. But I prefer to stalk hunt rather than wait to be approached because I'm easily bored and it gets cold. That's where sound and wind are big factors.

Deer will bed down during the day but you can still find them. It's most fun to hunt during the rut if possible, such as you can do in states like Wyoming during some seasons. Bucks in the rut are crazy and will be walking around all day looking to breed. When bow hunting you can call bull elk in during the rut; always an adventure! Big ass animals when they're within 20 yards of you!

Wear SILENT fabrics if possible, something that won't make noise when rubbing up against a branch or while your legs rub together. Keep your feet warm. I prefer the light weight camo binoculars in a 10 or 12 power with the widest range of view. Full size binocs are HEAVY. I've done spotting scopes but they get heavy and awkward if hiking in so I use my scope when needed. I prefer a day pack to hunt from camp or my vehicle rather than a full sized backpack. KNOW the weather report. I quarter elk out and make several trips or drag a deer whole after gutting it (that's where it's great to be heading back DOWNHILL).

As soon as you take an animal, bleed it out and then gut it out. Cooling that meat off is a priority. Get it hung up in a cool place ASAP, skinning it out if you didn't do it in the field, further helping it too cool off. Make sure you have a game bag to protect the meat as it hangs in camp. If you carry it out on your back be sure the antlers or horns aren't positioned such that another hunter will mistake you for a live animal. Orange strips or white cloth over the head or horns will help.

I usually hunt alone but having a hunting buddy is great, for a lot of different reasons.

Lots more to add but enough for now! Great prep makes for great hunting! Get an elevation topo map if hunting in a strange area. Warm comfortable layered clothing. Plenty of water.
Thank you so much for the reply, SO much info you gave me. I grew up in the PNW also (Seattle) and I mainly would just fish all around the state and in Lake WA when the coho would come into season. That was a sight to see, boats all over the water pulling salmon up days.

Doz on this site has offered up his knowledge to teach me, for which I greatly appreciate (THANKS DOZ) I would love to get a few trips under my belt and then ask my cousins up in Kalispell Montana to come up and join them in hunting trips, but I'll cross that bridge later. But I know that Doz has told me that he likes cow elk and that's one of the things he goes for every year, so I am excited to try the animal out (if were successful) as I've heard it's really delicious.

The ammo I will need to just go and buy myself and practice with it. I have some ammo that I need to shoot off and then I want some decent ammo during the hunt for sure.

What are lightweight camo binoculars? I really like the viper HD nockers by vortex in a 10 power, they felt really good in hand and didn't seem too heavy to me.

Silent clothes I feel are a must! I listen to a lot of hunting podcasts and shows and I hear this brought up quite a bit. There's a couple brands I like and need to look into more.

I see game bags are all over the place price-wise but I'm sure that the cheaper ones are just as good as the expensive ones.

Do you choose to hunt alone? or does it just end up working out that way?

One last question for you: What pack do you use?
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Old 01-21-2018, 03:27 AM   #66
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UPDATE: I took the hunter Ed course today and passed the test with flying colors 100% (was pretty easy regardless). So next up will be for me to purchase my license on Monday or Tuesday then, unless I'm missing something will be ready for putting in for tags in a month or two.
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Old 01-21-2018, 03:46 AM   #67
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Thank you so much for the reply, SO much info you gave me.

Doz on this site has offered up his knowledge to teach me, for which I greatly appreciate (THANKS DOZ) I would love to get a few trips under my belt and then ask my cousins up in Kalispell Montana to come up and join them in hunting trips, but I'll cross that bridge later. But I know that Doz has told me that he likes cow elk and that's one of the things he goes for every year, so I am excited to try the animal out (if were successful) as I've heard it's really delicious.

The ammo I will need to just go and buy myself and practice with it. I have some ammo that I need to shoot off and then I want some decent ammo during the hunt for sure.

What are lightweight camo binoculars? I really like the viper HD nockers by vortex in a 10 power, they felt really good in hand and didn't seem too heavy to me.

Silent clothes I feel are a must! I listen to a lot of hunting podcasts and shows and I hear this brought up quite a bit. There's a couple brands I like and need to look into more.

I see game bags are all over the place price-wise but I'm sure that the cheaper ones are just as good as the expensive ones.

Do you choose to hunt alone? or does it just end up working out that way?

One last question for you: What pack do you use?
I have this pack. http://www.badlandspacks.com/gear/pa...ch-bclutchappr

It's not what I wanted. I just wanted a plain external frame pack. But they didn't have one. I'm glad I got this pack because I packed it for a week up and down the mountain before harvesting my buck. Then I packed My buck out with it. I had the pack full of crap and water before I even shot the buck, but I was able to fit him all in there with the skull on top. Heavy sob it was. The pack unzips to expand for more room. It will even hold Your rifle or bow if You choose. It's not cheep but worth every penny. Also its made from that low noise fabric You speak of.
I'm not sure of any pack that would hold a whole elk though. I deboned My deer and it was more than i wanted to pack.

Good luck to Ya, Doz knows some great hunting areas. Elk are some of the smartest and hardest animals to hunt especially the cows. Those vortex 10x42 binoculars should be a great all around set.
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Old 01-21-2018, 03:50 AM   #68
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UPDATE: I took the hunter Ed course today and passed the test with flying colors 100% (was pretty easy regardless). So next up will be for me to purchase my license on Monday or Tuesday then, unless I'm missing something will be ready for putting in for tags in a month or two.
Wait till the and of February. All hunting and fishing licenses expire in February in NV. regardless of when You buy it. I think tag applications open in March. Spring turkey might be sooner though.
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Old 01-21-2018, 03:59 AM   #69
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Wait till the and of February. All hunting and fishing licenses expire in February in NV. regardless of when You buy it. I think tag applications open in March. Spring turkey might be sooner though.
I heard some people in class talking about this today. If I remember correct then they changed this in January to where the license now has an expiration of 1 year from when you bought it.
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Old 01-21-2018, 04:31 AM   #70
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I heard some people in class talking about this today. If I remember correct then they changed this in January to where the license now has an expiration of 1 year from when you bought it.
That would be nice. Let us know please. If the NDOW website ever comes back online I'll check that out.
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